Florida Gubernatorial Candidates to Speak at Upcoming State Social Studies Conference!

Our friends from the Florida Council for the Social Studies want to remind you of the upcoming conference!
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We are eagerly anticipating the exciting events planned for the 60th Annual Florida Council for the Social Studies Conference in Palm Harbor October 20 -22!

If you have already registered, you can look forward to these highlights:

  • The debut of the FCSS Time Machine, the opening reception for this years conference. During this time we encourage all attendees to dress to theme with a style from a decade in which FCSS has celebrated with an annual conference. (1958 to Present)
    decades
  • Over 80 exciting and meaningful sessions to support social studies educators in strengthening professional practices and engaging students in honoring the past, preserving the present and shaping the future. Please review the session matrix (available here:  2017 FCSS Session Descriptions)   to explore all of the wonderful session opportunities available to attend on Saturday and Sunday.
  • Saturday Mentor Session for supporting and recruiting knowledgeable and skillful social studies teachers, this session will provide educators with invaluable insights into professional practice.
  • Saturday General Session where attendees will have the opportunity to shape the future through a discussion with Florida Gubernatorial candidates focused on the shared commitment to the mission of Social Studies.
  • Free luncheon provided for all attendees with an interactive learning component sponsored by Studies Weekly.
  • Sunday keynote speaker who will provide an interactive experience with the opportunity to implement differentiated learning strategies to improve social studies achievement for English Language Learners and all students.
  • ​This is just a brief sampling of the jam packed weekend planned to nurture and support all social studies educators and advocates. ​

Haven’t registered yet? There is STILL time to secure your attendance for this exciting conference. Go to the FCSS website at http://fcss.org/meetinginfo.php, scroll down to the blue register now link, and register for the conference.

Looking forward to seeing everyone in Palm Harbor!
The Florida Council for the Social Studies Conference Committee


Teaching the Constitution with Political Cartoons

September 13, 2017, 7-8 p.m. ET

refer to captionAnyone Home? Cartoon by Clifford Berryman, 2/24/1920

Join the Center for Legislative Archives to discover how to use political cartoons to teach about the United States Constitution. This webinar will draw from the collection of Clifford K. Berryman cartoons from the U.S. Senate Collection. Berryman’s career as a political cartoonist in Washington, DC, spanned five decades and his cartoons are a rich resource for history and civics lessons.

During this interactive webinar, you will practice techniques for helping students evaluate visual content and explore ideas for how to use political cartoons to illustrate the “Big Ideas” of the Constitution, such as separation of powers and representative democracy. You will also explore additional resources from the National Archives for integrating political cartoons in the classroom, such as DocsTeach.org. This webinar is designed for middle school and high school educators. Register for the webinar here.

 

Information about other upcoming webinars offered by our friends at the National Archives is available here! Check it out today.


A New Approach for FJCC

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As folks are likely aware at this point, funding for the Lou Frey Institute was vetoed by Governor Scott. The work of the Florida Joint Center for Citizenship falls under the umbrella of LFI, so obviously the loss of funding is, for us, significant. While we continue to work on grants and other opportunities to raise funds (and still seeking some sort of university or legislative solution), this sudden turn of events means some changes in our work.

To be clear, the Florida Joint Center for Citizenship at the Lou Frey Institute will continue to support teachers, schools, and districts to the best of our ability. Our curricular resources will not go away; indeed, we continue to refine and improve and expand what we have. The Florida Citizen website will be getting new materials later this year around action civics, high school government, and, perhaps, Florida’s new legislatively mandated Founders Month. Development and improvement on Civics360 continues; we have just added four new videos around benchmark 4.3 for example. We are working on an update to the Florida’s Civic Health website as well.

As needed and as possible, we will strive to meet face to face PD requests; however, we may not longer be able to respond in the affirmative to all requests, thanks to a vastly reduced travel budget. HOWEVER, we do have some exciting news that has arisen out of that unfortunate circumstance. The Florida Joint Center for Citizenship at the Lou Frey Institute is beginning the transition towards becoming an online professional development provider!

Currently, we are collaborating internally on developing a Canvas-based set of interactive modules (we hesitate to call it a course) targeting new teachers and what they need to know for teaching civics. We will be piloting this effort with a small number of districts for now; lessons learned from this will guide the next iteration and allow us to open it up to more folks. We also plan on offering additional data, content, and pedagogy oriented modules as we move forward. We have also just completed a new online narrated support PowerPoint around interpreting data that we will be posting for you within the next week!

We are incredibly excited by this new direction. Sometimes, what seems like disaster can simply be turned into a challenge. And that is true in this case. We have had to ask the question about how we can do more with even less, and we have high hopes and expectations that offering support online, with the same excellent staff you are used to, is a way to overcome that challenge. This Canvas-based approach will always involve the opportunity for questions, collaboration, and communication with the FJCC team.

Again, we will continue to support you to the best of our ability. The Florida Joint Center for Citizenship at the Lou Frey Institute is not going anywhere in the short term. We are simply going to follow a new path in supporting the work that wonderful teachers do in civic education.

We are always open to questions or suggestions, so please feel free to contact us at any time! 


Linking Literacy and Civic Action: A DBQ Project/FJCC Collaboration

We know that exposing students early to, and helping them contextualize and understand, primary sources is vital to helping them begin thinking within a disciplinary lens while also building literacy skills. This means that we really need to begin the work of social studies and civic education while our future citizens are still in elementary school. In pursuit of this idea, the Florida Joint Center for Citizenship, in collaboration with the renowned folks over at the DBQ Project, are excited to offer an opportunity for 3rd, 4th, and 5th grade teachers to work together in extending the DBQ Project towards lessons around civic action. If you are at all familiar with the C3 Framework, this also fits wonderful within that ambitious effort at inculcating within our students a passion for civic engagement, inquiry, and informed action. Take a look at the flyer below. We do hope to see you here this summer, and we are grateful for the opportunity to work with you! For more information and to register, visit this page and sign on up!

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Florida Council for the Social Studies 2017 Conference

Hello friends. The 2017 Florida Council for the Social Studies Conference is now accepting proposals for this fall.

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This is the 60th annual conference for FCSS, and we expect some excellent opportunities for engagement with social studies teachers and leaders from across the state and country. The conference will be help on October 20-22, 2017 in Palm Harbor, Florida.

More information about the conference can be found on the FCSS homepage. We look forward to seeing you in Palm Harbor!


FJCC New Civics Teacher Webinar: What to Expect When You Are Expecting the Civics EOCA now available!

Good morning, friends of FJCC and civics. Our recent webinar, What to Expect When You are Expecting the Civics EOCA, is now available. In it, you will find an overview and discussion of Florida’s Civics EOCA, hosted by our own Peggy Renihan. Materials and resources relevant to the webinar are available here. 

You can access the annotated PowerPoint PDF below. The transcription is available on each slide as notes.
Annotated What to Expect When you are Expecting the EOCA

Should you have issues, please contact me.  Our next webinar will occur on March 29th, 2017 at 4:30 EST. It will cover review and remediation for the Civics EOCA. Registration will be open soon!

 


Action Civics Survey

Heli Mishael, a student at Harvard’s Kennedy School, is doing some investigatory research around action civics and what teachers need to effectively implement an action civics approach in their classroom. This is definitely a question we here at FJCC would be interested in getting an answer to, so if you have some time, please take this survey!

Questions on this survey may be directed to Heli Mishael  Thanks for taking the survey and hopefully contributing to the body of knowledge about what might be needed!


Upcoming SOURCES Conference at UCF!

SOURCES Annual Conference
University of Central Florida
Orlando, Florida
Saturday, January 14, 2017

The Teaching with Primary Sources Program at the University of Central Florida (TPS-UCF) will be hosting the third annual SOURCES Annual Conference at the University of Central Florida on Saturday, January 14, 2017. The SOURCES Annual Conference is a free opportunity available to any educators interested in the utilization and integration of primary sources into K-12 teaching. Presenters will focus on providing strategies for using primary sources to help K-12 students engage in learning, develop critical thinking skills, and build content knowledge, specifically in one or more of the following ways:
Justifying conclusions about whether a source is primary or secondary depending upon the time or topic under study;
Describing examples of the benefits of teaching with primary sources;
Analyzing a primary source using Library of Congress tools;
Accssing teaching tools and primary sources from www.loc.gov/teachers;
Identifying key considerations for selecting primary sources for instructional use (for example, student needs and interests, teaching goals, etc.);
Accessing primary sources and teaching resources from www.loc.gov for instructional use;
Analyzing primary sources in different formats;
Analyzing a set of related primary sources in order to identify multiple perspectives;
Demonstrating how primary sources can support at least one teaching strategy (for example, literacy, inquiry-based learning, historical thinking, etc.); and
Presenting a primary source-based activity that helps students engage in learning, develop critical thinking skills and construct knowledge.

Dr. Michael Berson and Dr. Ilene Berson, of the University of South Florida, and Bert Snow, of Muzzy Lane Software, will provide the Keynote Presentation, Historical Inquiry with Primary Sources: The Kid Citizen App for Young Learners. In this session, they will discuss about and present ways in which educators can use an application that they collaboratively developed in order to foster young children’s inquiry with Library of Congress primary sources focusing on Congress and civic participation. Templates to add content will be demonstrated. Additional session titles include the following:

· Primary Source Analysis in Elementary Grades: A Tool for Building Critical Literacy Skills
· Integrating Current Events and Geography into Social Studies Curriculum
· Examining the Cold War through Primary Sources
· Teaching with Primary Sources through A Geography Lens
· Making Texts Accessible: Situated Word Learning and Scaffolded Inquiry
· WGBH/PBS Learning Media: US History Interactive Modules for Grades 9-12
· Venture Smith’s Real Voyage
· Building Civic Competencies with Primary Sources
· Teacher-Leaders & Professional Development
· Library of Congress Resources – BYOD
· Emerging Technologies for Promoting Inquiry: A Top 10 List
· The Kids Are Alright: Children from the Past Tell Their Stories
· Archiving It! – K-12 Web Archiving Program
· Using Primary Sources to Engage All Learners in U.S. History
· Finding a Voice in History Using Found Poetry to Construct Meaning
· Social Studies and Social Media: Engaging Students in their Medium
· The Interactive Constitution: Non-partisan Civics Education for 21st Century Classrooms
· Island in Transition: How Cuba’s Past will Influence its Future
· Exploring the History of Local Schools
· Hollywood or History? Using Primary and Secondary Source to Analyze Film
· Examining the Civil Rights Movement from a Historian’s Eye
· Emerging Technologies for Promoting Inquiry: A Top 10 List
· Kindergarten Historians and the Power of Primary Sources
· Student-created History Labs for the Secondary Classroom
· Perspectives & Voices from Reconstruction
· Myth-Making in the News: Tracing Sojourner Truth’s Legacy
· Leveraging Library of Congress Materials to Teach Second Order Historical Concepts

Registration is free and is open for the SOURCES Annual Conference. Register now: http://www.sourcesconference.com/registration.


Even MORE Upcoming FCSS Sessions!

So this weekend is the start of the Florida Council for the Social Studies Annual Conference. Have you registered yet? Are you coming? We hope you are coming, because we have some awesome sessions lined up. You can learn more about the keynote speaker here, and you can go here and here to get get an overview of some of the sessions we have planned. So with that out of the way, let’s take another look at some of the quality sessions we have lined up for you this weekend.

Saturday Morning, Concurrent Session 1

Factors Relating to U.S. History End of Course Exam for African American Students Irenea Walker, University of Central Florida

If social studies teachers properly alter their pedagogical approaches, African American students can learn to appreciate learning about historical facts. This paper focuses upon creative lessons that focus on interactive activities to peak interest.

eoc-graphic

Engaging the 21st Century Learner Amanda Mudlock and Rich Sayers, Pearson

Build academic skills for 21st century students through inquiry-based learning by facilitating easy projects, civic discussions, and document-based questions. Teach students to take ownership of their ideas, work together, and communicate clearly. 

21st-cent-kid

Curating Your Collection: Promoting Content Area Literacy by Giving Student Tools
to Explore Social Studies Texts  Heather Cerra, Northwest Elementary School, Hillsborough County Public Schools

How can teachers spark student interest in informational and historical fiction texts related to social studies content? Using a unique framework, teachers can build student engagement and realize student growth in the areas of vocabulary and comprehension. (Elementary Session!)

hillsborough

Saturday Afternoon, Concurrent Session 2

The Great Travel Fair: A Cross-Curricular Unit of Study Amy Trujillo, Orange / Orlando Science Elementary School

Now in it’s fourth year, The Great Travel Fair combines ELA, Science, Social Studies, and Math in order for students to understand the regions of the United States through a balance of 21st century skills. 

interdisciplinary
Public History, Memory, and Survival: Producing History Through Student
Centered Technology  Joshua Stern, St. Johns Country Day School

Attendees will learn how to use iMovie to allow students to bring stories of Holocaust survival to life. Students become active public historians and create meaningful results by preserving and transmitting these vital personal histories.

imovie

Saturday Afternoon, Concurrent Session 3

St. Augustine Civil Rights Movement: Seamless Integration into your Classroom Blake Pridgen & Benjamin Rome, Flagler College

Utilizing the primary sources in Flagler College’s Civil Rights Library of St. Augustine (CRLSA: http://civilrights.flagler.edu), teachers will learn to effectively teach Florida’s involvement in the civil rights movement, grades 4-12.

crlsa

Sunday Morning, Concurrent Session 7

The State of the Assessment: Civics End-of-Course Assessment Stacy Skinner, Ed. D., Social Studies Coordinator, Test Development Center; Elise Beachy, Annette Boyd Pitts, Robert Brazofsky, Maureen Carter, Erin Conklin, Christy Disinger, George Masek, Stephen Masyada, Ph.D., Peggy Renihan, Chris Spinale, Jackie Viana

This annual conference message about the middle school Civics EOCA will provide an overview of implementation, a review of student performance data, and a discussion about test development with Florida educators involved in the process. (Note: A similiar session around the US History EOCA will be offered earlier in the morning.)

Demographic Breakdown

Achievement Level by Demographic Background

Context and Comparison: At the heart of AP World History Robert Strayer and Patrick Whelan, Bedford, Freeman & Worth Publishers

This session provides resources—both content and pedagogical—for effectively teaching contextualization and its companion skill of comparison. It addresses the much increased role of contextual thinking in the new exam format. 

apworldspongebob

 

This has been just taste of the possibilities. Please be sure to check out additional session descriptions at 2016-fcss-session-descriptions, and earlier posts on what is shaping up to be a great conference session here, here, here, and here on why you should attend! Hey, it will be worth it for the trick or treating alone!

You can register for FCSS online. It’s a great and affordable conference, and a chance to meet folks you can work with and learn from. Hope to see you here in Orlando. The hashtag for the conference, by the way, will be #FLCSS16. Join us!


National Archives Berryman Webinar Coming Soon!

Friends in Social Studies, we are excited to announce that the Florida Joint Center for Citizenship has partnered with the National Archives Center for Legislative Archives to host a webinar around the legendary Clifford Berryman political cartoons! This webinar will be led by specialists from the National Archives, and is based in part on workshops that NARA’s fantastic Dr. Charles Flanagan has done in the past. Check out the description below, and please be sure to register! You will be sent a link to access the webinar prior to November 2.

Politics in Perspective: Teaching Elections Using the Cartoons of Clifford K. Berryman
Wednesday, November 2, 2016 at 4:30 p.m.ET

In this interactive webinar, discover how political cartoons can engage students in today’s elections by introducing the process and issues at a safe historical distance. Practice techniques for analyzing political cartoons in the classroom and learn about additional resources from the Center for Legislative Archives, part of the National Archives and Records Administration.
This webinar will last approximately one hour. Registration required.

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We hope to ‘see’ you there! Questions on the webinar can be directed to me or to Ms. Val McVey, and we will be happy to answer them!